FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALANNE: LA SAUTERELLE

LA SAUTERELLE - FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALANNE, 1970

A few pieces have caught my attention at this year’s Masterpiece at the Royal Chelsea Hospital, but only one stole my heart in a flash. Or, more aptly, in a flutter. ‘The Grasshopper’ (La Sauterelle) by François-Xavier Lalanne is a striking Sèvres porcelain, steel and brass bar created by the artist in Paris in 1970. The influence of surrealism, art nouveau, modernism and more than hint of baroque can all be found in this eye-catching work of art. But it is the nostalgic journey back in time to a childhood…

WILLIAM KENTRIDGE: THICK TIME

UNTITLED (BICYCLE WHEEL II) - WILLIAM KENTRIDGE, 2012

From the moment you step into ‘Thick Time‘ by South African artist William Kentridge, it is easy to understand why this new exhibition at The Whitechapel Gallery holds such broad appeal. It is bold, dramatic, visionary and nostalgic, making art accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds. The many children present seem to love it. The common denominators of the six large scale installations are themes incorporated in most of his works: time, space and history. The mesmerising whirlwind of theatrical compositions manages not to lose sight of the details whilst upscaling the spectacle. ‘The Refusal…

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE AND DOROTHEA TANNING

GREY LINES WITH BLACK, BLUE AND YELLOW -GEORGIA O'KEEFFE, 1923

It just so happens that I had a very clear idea of what to expect from these exhibitions and I was proven wrong twice in the space of an afternoon. In a sort of misplaced and rather contemptible botanical association of mine, I decided to combine a visit to ‘Georgia O’Keeffe‘ at Tate Modern with ‘Dorothea Tanning: Flower Paintings‘ at the Alison Jacques Gallery. Had there been a retrospective of Robert Mapplethorpe in London, I would have added it to the marathon just to annoy the art purists out there. Despite spending a…

HELSINKI NOIR – A CRIME TO SOLVE

Helsinki Noir

Visitors aren’t just invited to view, but inhabit the places of ’Helsinki Noir’ at the Amos Anderson Art Museum in Helsinki. Set against the backdrop of the Finnish capital in the 1930s, the narrative of the exhibition opens with a crime scene. The body of a young woman in a short dress and silk stockings is found floating in the sea just off Kaivopuisto park. You’d be forgiven for thinking you have just stepped into the set of an elaborate episode of David Suchet’s Poirot. What happened to the woman…